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Course Details

Title Seminar: Media Industry in Korea
Field of Study Art, Media
Professor Changhee Chun (changhee.chun@uta.edu)
Type Academic course
Delivery Type Hybrid Track (2 weeks online + 2 weeks offline): Real-time
Credits 3
Contact hours 45
Schedule Evening
Course code ISS1006
Course number 18030
Description

How do the contemporary media industries including film and Broadcasting in Korea work?  How can an analysis of the “business of entertainment” enable a greater understanding of contemporary media aesthetics and culture?  What are the major effects by the media in Korean and Asian society?

This course takes a critical approach to the study of the production and consumption of mass media, focusing on both film and broadcasting industry in Korea. The course assumes that mass media and the industries that produce media products play significant cultural and political roles in contemporary societies.

There will be a series of guest lectures by industry professionals including a film director, a TV producer, and movie actors to hear their work experiences in media industry in Korea.   This will provide students to gain the valuable insights about the entertainment business in Korea. Screenings and guest lectures guide discussions and analysis geared toward providing familiarity with a broad range of media productions in Korea and connecting them to larger questions of culture production and artistic expression.

Objective

This course will prove useful not only to media studies students but also to any student interested in understanding how and why certain media products do (and do not) get produced and distributed and what process will be involved in media making.  In addition, students will be able to understand the basic structure and making process in the film and broadcasting industry in Korea.

This seminar class is designed to give students an opportunity to study the media landscape in Korea from a truly international perspective—not only in theory, but in fact. By talking with a wide array of experts who live and work in a Korean media environment, students are able to see familiar media issues in a new light—even as they become more familiar with other media cultures.

On completion of this course, students will understand film and other media production process as an entertainment business in Korea, based on its basic components and cultural background.

 

  • To examine and understand how film and broadcasting industry work in Korea
  • To better understand another culture and production methods through the study of media industry in Korea and comparison of different media.
  • To describe varying ways of interpreting the relationship between media and society in Korea.

To Compare and contrast differing approaches to professional media careers in an international context.

Preparations

I’ll email you the course-pack entitled: Seminar: Media Industry in Korea Study Guide

Materials
Evaluation
Presentation
30%
Final
40%
Participation
10%
Assignment
20%
Lesson Plan
Class 1: Introduction to the course, syllabus, schedule Deciding the research topic for the first research report Overview of media Industry in Korea
Class 2: Research report example: Print Media Mass Media in Society Media effects and case study
Class 3: Guest Lecture 1
Class 4: Print Media Research Report & Discussion
Class 5: Film Industry in Korea 1 : Major Production Company Research Report & Discussion
Class 6: Film Industry in Korea 2 : Korean Films and Movements Research Report & Discussion
Class 7: Korean Wave (Han-ryu) 1 Research Report & Discussion
Class 8: Guest Lecture 2
Class 9: Korean Wave (Han-ryu) 2 Research Report & Discussion
Class 10: TV Drama / Broadcast Media 1 Research Report & Discussion
Class 11: TV Drama / Broadcast Media 2 Research Report & Discussion
Class 12: Guest Lecture 3
Class 13: Korean Pop Music (K-Pop) 1 Research Report & Discussion Research Method for Media Company Profile
Class 14: Korean Pop Music (K-Pop) 2 Research Report & Discussion
Class 15: Final Presentation, Review and Reflection
Last Updated April 15, 2021
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